ROMANS 12:1-21 HERE we enter on the second division of this Epistle, where Paul, according to his accustomed method, enforces the duties of believers, by arguments dependent on his previous exhibition of the grand and influential doctrines of the Gospel.These doctrines, as well as all the commandments of God, may be summed up in one word, namely, in\parLOVE. see 1 Corinthians 1:10; Romans 15:30. acceptable to God through the mediation of his Son, by whom, as the persons, the souls and bodies of his people, so their spiritual sacrifices, whether of prayer or praise, are only acceptable to him: which is your reasonable service; it is agreeably to reason, and especially as sanctified, that men who have their beings from God, and are upheld in them by him, and are followed with the bounties of Providence; and especially who are made new creatures, and are blessed by him with all spiritual blessings in Christ, that they should give up themselves to him, and cheerfully serve him in their day and generation; such service is also agreeably to the Scriptures of truth, the standard of filth and practice, and contain and enforce nothing but what is highly reasonable to be complied with; it is such service as lies not in the slaying of irrational creatures, but in the presenting of men endued with rational powers unto God; and is of a spiritual nature, performed by spiritual men, under the influence of the Spirit of God: and is suitable to the nature and perfections of God, and stands opposed to the corporeal and carnal service of the Jews. That word λογικὴν logikēn denotes what pertains to the mind, and a reasonable service means what is mental, or pertaining to reason. 2 And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God. Therefore.—We may well believe that the Apostle having brought his argument up to a climax at the close of the last chapter, would make a pause in his dictation, and perhaps not resume it until another sitting. Religion is free; and the act of devoting ourselves to God is one of the most free that we ever perform. Let thine eye look upon no evil thing, and it hath become a sacrifice; let thy tongue speak nothing filthy, and it hath become an offering; let thy hand do no lawless deed, and it hath become a whole burnt offering. Commentary on Romans 12:1-8 View Bible Text While the argument of the letter to the Romans opened with a preoccupation regarding God’s anger (1:18-32), this section of the letter opens with an embrace of God’s mercies. The first part of this passage reminds us that we are unable to put others first without God’s saving grace. (3) In this light, what are we to think of the so-called "unbloody sacrifice of the mass, continually offered to God as a propitiation for the sins both of the living and the dead," which the adherents of Rome's corrupt faith have been taught for ages to believe is the highest and holiest act of Christian worship--in direct opposition to the sublimely simple teaching which the Christians of Rome first received ( … Ministers of the gospel should be gentle, tender, and affectionate. As Wesley, the failed missionary, said later: “While he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed. J.B. Phillips has an outstanding and memorable translation of Romans 12:1-2: With eyes wide open to the mercies of God, I beg you, my brothers, as an act of intelligent worship, to give Him your bodies, as a living sacrifice, consecrated to Him and acceptable by Him. It implies that he who offers it presents it entirely, releases all claim or right to it, and leaves it to be disposed of for the honor of God. Specifically, we will attempt to speculate on the reason why Paul wrote Romans 12:1-13. spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God by Jesus Christ. a. Romans 12:14-17 Commentary. In like manner we are to consecrate to God our best faculties; the vigor of our minds, and talents, and time. There is something very affecting in the view of such a sacrifice; in regarding life, with all its energies, its intellectual, and moral, and physical powers, as one long sacrifice; one continued offering unto God. The apostle specifies their bodies particularly in reference to that fact. Familiarity often breeds contempt and since we have heard the words of Romans 12:1 and 2 so often, we might think we will learn nothing new from them. Romans 12:3-6 Commentary. The Jew offered his victim, slew it, and presented it dead. Which is your reasonable service (τὴν λογικὴν λατρείαν). Reasonable service.—The English phrase is somewhat ambiguous. If offered without any of these defects, it was regarded as holy, that is, appropriately set apart, or consecrated to God. It was not customary or proper to speak of a sacrifice as an offering of a soul or spirit, in the common language of the Jews; and hence, the apostle applied their customary language of sacrifice to the offering which Christians were to make of themselves to God. The word "reasonable" with us means what is "governed by reason; thinking, speaking, or acting conformably to the dictates of reason" (Webster); or what can be shown to be rational or proper. Let the tongue utter nothing base, and it is an offering. Note, secondly, the relation between this priestly service and other kinds of worship. All rights reserved. Commentary, Romans 12:1-8, Mary Hinkle Shore,, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2011." unto God—not as the Levitical offerings, merely as appointed symbols of spiritual ideas, but objects, intrinsically, of divine complacency, in their renewed character, and endeared relationship to Him through His Son Jesus Christ. It is the technical term for presenting the Levitical victims and offerings. Romans 12:1. παρακαλῶ οὖν: the reference is to all that has been said since Romans 1:16, but especially to what more closely precedes. (3) the character of God is such as should lead us to that. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. It could not be presented again. Your bodies - The bodies of animals were offered in sacrifice. Duties of Believers, General and Particular. Believers are to dedicate themselves to God. Paul wrote to address a local problem or crisis. From expressions like these, it is clear that the apostle never supposed that the tendency of the doctrines of grace was to lead to licentiousness. So, expressly, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. It demands vigorous and active powers in the service of God the Saviour. Sanctification extends to the whole man (1Th 5:23, 24). ... C. K. Barrett, A Commentary on t he Epistle to the Romans (New York: Harper and Row, 1957), p. 231. II. This was a ground or reason why they should devote themselves to God. “Therefore I exhort you, brothers and sisters, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a sacrifice – alive, holy, and pleasing to God – which is your reasonable service. The worshipper must offer, or present, before God, himself, with all his living energies and powers directed consciously to God’s service. Romans 13:3-4 Commentary. In order to seek His full blessing, and live out God’s holy will, there lie before us three things. But it is plain that Paul had no such apprehensions. To please him should be our highest aim; the fact that we do please him is our highest reward. The word "mercies" here denotes favor shown to the undeserving, or kindness, compassion, etc. The Holy Spirit (through Paul) tells us how we can be transformable in Romans 12:1-2. That ye present - The word used here commonly denotes the action of bringing and presenting an animal or other sacrifice before an altar. By the mercies of God: he useth the word in the plural number, to amplify and set forth the manifold mercies of God, in election, justification, adoption, &c.: q.d. Romans 12:1-20 New International Version (NIV) A Living Sacrifice 12 Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. The introduction to these exhortations, is in a very kind and affectionate manner; the saints are addressed as "brethren", and very appropriately; since this expresses the relation they stood in to the apostle, for whom he had an hearty love and concern; and therefore what he pressed them to was out of a sincere regard to their good, as well as to the glory of God; also their relation to each other, and which several of the duties he urges had a connection with; likewise their relation to God, being of his family, having one and the same Father, and so under obligation to regard his will, honour and reverence him: moreover, these things are moved, not in an imperious way, in an authoritative manner, but by way of entreaty, "I beseech you"; as an ambassador of Christ, and as though in his stead: nor are they enforced by terrors, threats, and menaces, but "by the mercies of God"; that is, the abundant mercy of God, displayed in their election, regeneration, and calling; than which, nothing can have a greater influence on a believer, to engage him to holiness of life and conversation; and shows, that the doctrines of grace are no licentious ones, nor do they render useless precepts, exhortations, entreaties, cautions, and advice, particularly such as follow; that ye present your bodies; not barely that part of them commonly so called, for this is not to be understood of a mere presentation of the body in public worship: for though this ought to be, yet not without the heart engaged therein, otherwise bodily exercise will be of no avail; nor of a bare abstinence from grosser sins done in the body, and against it, and which defile and dishonour it; much less of a maceration, and keeping under the body, by watchings, fasting, &c. and still less of an offering of the body at death in a way of martyrdom, though this ought to be cheerfully complied with when called for: but by their bodies are meant, themselves, their whole souls and bodies, all the powers and faculties of their souls, and members of their bodies; and the presenting of them, designs a devoting of them, with all readiness and willingness, to the service of God for his honour and glory, without putting any confidence in, or placing any dependence upon them; which would be sacrificing to their own net, and burning incense to their drag; it includes the whole of their service, conversation, and religion, internal and external. Compiled & Edited by BST & Crosswalk Staff, California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. A list of the best commentaries on Romans ranked by scholars, journal reviews, and site users. Some spiritual gift — With such gifts the Corinthians, who had enjoyed the presence of St. Paul, abounded, 1 Corinthians 1:7; 12:1; 14:1. Having thoroughly and systematically presented every aspect of the glorious gospel of Salvation, and the eternal foundation of God’s amazing grace, … And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed41by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect. It’s for your own good, it’s My will, and it pleases Me.” God’s almighty powerful Spirit is living inside of us. romans 12:1-2. Still the entire animal was devoted; and Paul evidently meant here the same as to say, present Yourselves, your entire person, to the service of God; compare 1 Corinthians 6:16; James 3:6. We'll send you an email with steps on how to reset your password. Commentary on Romans 12:1-8 View Bible Text At first glance, Paul’s appeal to his audience to “present your bodies as a living sacrifice” for “your spiritual worship” might sound like he is demanding an esoteric or mystical kind of devotion. This commentary has been through Advanced Checking.. Notice that the days of sacrifice are not over. It implies that the action was a free and voluntary offering. THE CHRISTIAN'S DUTY. 4 What then shall we say that Abraham, our forefather according to the flesh, discovered in this matter? Commentary on Romans 12:1,2 (Read Romans 12:1,2) The apostle having closed the part of his epistle wherein he argues and proves various doctrines which are practically applied, here urges important duties from gospel principles. Type Of Mate You'll Have, Gothenburg Weather Yearly, How To Add Color Back To Bleached Hair, Dried Eucalyptus Leaves Uses, Rosemary Leaves In Telugu, Renaissance Hotel Santa Barbara, Simukai Chigudu Age, Monoprice Subwoofer Singapore, Husqvarna 365 Throttle Lock, "/> romans 12:1 commentary ROMANS 12:1-21 HERE we enter on the second division of this Epistle, where Paul, according to his accustomed method, enforces the duties of believers, by arguments dependent on his previous exhibition of the grand and influential doctrines of the Gospel.These doctrines, as well as all the commandments of God, may be summed up in one word, namely, in\parLOVE. see 1 Corinthians 1:10; Romans 15:30. acceptable to God through the mediation of his Son, by whom, as the persons, the souls and bodies of his people, so their spiritual sacrifices, whether of prayer or praise, are only acceptable to him: which is your reasonable service; it is agreeably to reason, and especially as sanctified, that men who have their beings from God, and are upheld in them by him, and are followed with the bounties of Providence; and especially who are made new creatures, and are blessed by him with all spiritual blessings in Christ, that they should give up themselves to him, and cheerfully serve him in their day and generation; such service is also agreeably to the Scriptures of truth, the standard of filth and practice, and contain and enforce nothing but what is highly reasonable to be complied with; it is such service as lies not in the slaying of irrational creatures, but in the presenting of men endued with rational powers unto God; and is of a spiritual nature, performed by spiritual men, under the influence of the Spirit of God: and is suitable to the nature and perfections of God, and stands opposed to the corporeal and carnal service of the Jews. That word λογικὴν logikēn denotes what pertains to the mind, and a reasonable service means what is mental, or pertaining to reason. 2 And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God. Therefore.—We may well believe that the Apostle having brought his argument up to a climax at the close of the last chapter, would make a pause in his dictation, and perhaps not resume it until another sitting. Religion is free; and the act of devoting ourselves to God is one of the most free that we ever perform. Let thine eye look upon no evil thing, and it hath become a sacrifice; let thy tongue speak nothing filthy, and it hath become an offering; let thy hand do no lawless deed, and it hath become a whole burnt offering. Commentary on Romans 12:1-8 View Bible Text While the argument of the letter to the Romans opened with a preoccupation regarding God’s anger (1:18-32), this section of the letter opens with an embrace of God’s mercies. The first part of this passage reminds us that we are unable to put others first without God’s saving grace. (3) In this light, what are we to think of the so-called "unbloody sacrifice of the mass, continually offered to God as a propitiation for the sins both of the living and the dead," which the adherents of Rome's corrupt faith have been taught for ages to believe is the highest and holiest act of Christian worship--in direct opposition to the sublimely simple teaching which the Christians of Rome first received ( … Ministers of the gospel should be gentle, tender, and affectionate. As Wesley, the failed missionary, said later: “While he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed. J.B. Phillips has an outstanding and memorable translation of Romans 12:1-2: With eyes wide open to the mercies of God, I beg you, my brothers, as an act of intelligent worship, to give Him your bodies, as a living sacrifice, consecrated to Him and acceptable by Him. It implies that he who offers it presents it entirely, releases all claim or right to it, and leaves it to be disposed of for the honor of God. Specifically, we will attempt to speculate on the reason why Paul wrote Romans 12:1-13. spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God by Jesus Christ. a. Romans 12:14-17 Commentary. In like manner we are to consecrate to God our best faculties; the vigor of our minds, and talents, and time. There is something very affecting in the view of such a sacrifice; in regarding life, with all its energies, its intellectual, and moral, and physical powers, as one long sacrifice; one continued offering unto God. The apostle specifies their bodies particularly in reference to that fact. Familiarity often breeds contempt and since we have heard the words of Romans 12:1 and 2 so often, we might think we will learn nothing new from them. Romans 12:3-6 Commentary. The Jew offered his victim, slew it, and presented it dead. Which is your reasonable service (τὴν λογικὴν λατρείαν). Reasonable service.—The English phrase is somewhat ambiguous. If offered without any of these defects, it was regarded as holy, that is, appropriately set apart, or consecrated to God. It was not customary or proper to speak of a sacrifice as an offering of a soul or spirit, in the common language of the Jews; and hence, the apostle applied their customary language of sacrifice to the offering which Christians were to make of themselves to God. The word "reasonable" with us means what is "governed by reason; thinking, speaking, or acting conformably to the dictates of reason" (Webster); or what can be shown to be rational or proper. Let the tongue utter nothing base, and it is an offering. Note, secondly, the relation between this priestly service and other kinds of worship. All rights reserved. Commentary, Romans 12:1-8, Mary Hinkle Shore,, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2011." unto God—not as the Levitical offerings, merely as appointed symbols of spiritual ideas, but objects, intrinsically, of divine complacency, in their renewed character, and endeared relationship to Him through His Son Jesus Christ. It is the technical term for presenting the Levitical victims and offerings. Romans 12:1. παρακαλῶ οὖν: the reference is to all that has been said since Romans 1:16, but especially to what more closely precedes. (3) the character of God is such as should lead us to that. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. It could not be presented again. Your bodies - The bodies of animals were offered in sacrifice. Duties of Believers, General and Particular. Believers are to dedicate themselves to God. Paul wrote to address a local problem or crisis. From expressions like these, it is clear that the apostle never supposed that the tendency of the doctrines of grace was to lead to licentiousness. So, expressly, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. It demands vigorous and active powers in the service of God the Saviour. Sanctification extends to the whole man (1Th 5:23, 24). ... C. K. Barrett, A Commentary on t he Epistle to the Romans (New York: Harper and Row, 1957), p. 231. II. This was a ground or reason why they should devote themselves to God. “Therefore I exhort you, brothers and sisters, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a sacrifice – alive, holy, and pleasing to God – which is your reasonable service. The worshipper must offer, or present, before God, himself, with all his living energies and powers directed consciously to God’s service. Romans 13:3-4 Commentary. In order to seek His full blessing, and live out God’s holy will, there lie before us three things. But it is plain that Paul had no such apprehensions. To please him should be our highest aim; the fact that we do please him is our highest reward. The word "mercies" here denotes favor shown to the undeserving, or kindness, compassion, etc. The Holy Spirit (through Paul) tells us how we can be transformable in Romans 12:1-2. That ye present - The word used here commonly denotes the action of bringing and presenting an animal or other sacrifice before an altar. By the mercies of God: he useth the word in the plural number, to amplify and set forth the manifold mercies of God, in election, justification, adoption, &c.: q.d. Romans 12:1-20 New International Version (NIV) A Living Sacrifice 12 Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. The introduction to these exhortations, is in a very kind and affectionate manner; the saints are addressed as "brethren", and very appropriately; since this expresses the relation they stood in to the apostle, for whom he had an hearty love and concern; and therefore what he pressed them to was out of a sincere regard to their good, as well as to the glory of God; also their relation to each other, and which several of the duties he urges had a connection with; likewise their relation to God, being of his family, having one and the same Father, and so under obligation to regard his will, honour and reverence him: moreover, these things are moved, not in an imperious way, in an authoritative manner, but by way of entreaty, "I beseech you"; as an ambassador of Christ, and as though in his stead: nor are they enforced by terrors, threats, and menaces, but "by the mercies of God"; that is, the abundant mercy of God, displayed in their election, regeneration, and calling; than which, nothing can have a greater influence on a believer, to engage him to holiness of life and conversation; and shows, that the doctrines of grace are no licentious ones, nor do they render useless precepts, exhortations, entreaties, cautions, and advice, particularly such as follow; that ye present your bodies; not barely that part of them commonly so called, for this is not to be understood of a mere presentation of the body in public worship: for though this ought to be, yet not without the heart engaged therein, otherwise bodily exercise will be of no avail; nor of a bare abstinence from grosser sins done in the body, and against it, and which defile and dishonour it; much less of a maceration, and keeping under the body, by watchings, fasting, &c. and still less of an offering of the body at death in a way of martyrdom, though this ought to be cheerfully complied with when called for: but by their bodies are meant, themselves, their whole souls and bodies, all the powers and faculties of their souls, and members of their bodies; and the presenting of them, designs a devoting of them, with all readiness and willingness, to the service of God for his honour and glory, without putting any confidence in, or placing any dependence upon them; which would be sacrificing to their own net, and burning incense to their drag; it includes the whole of their service, conversation, and religion, internal and external. Compiled & Edited by BST & Crosswalk Staff, California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. A list of the best commentaries on Romans ranked by scholars, journal reviews, and site users. Some spiritual gift — With such gifts the Corinthians, who had enjoyed the presence of St. Paul, abounded, 1 Corinthians 1:7; 12:1; 14:1. Having thoroughly and systematically presented every aspect of the glorious gospel of Salvation, and the eternal foundation of God’s amazing grace, … And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed41by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect. It’s for your own good, it’s My will, and it pleases Me.” God’s almighty powerful Spirit is living inside of us. romans 12:1-2. Still the entire animal was devoted; and Paul evidently meant here the same as to say, present Yourselves, your entire person, to the service of God; compare 1 Corinthians 6:16; James 3:6. We'll send you an email with steps on how to reset your password. Commentary on Romans 12:1-8 View Bible Text At first glance, Paul’s appeal to his audience to “present your bodies as a living sacrifice” for “your spiritual worship” might sound like he is demanding an esoteric or mystical kind of devotion. This commentary has been through Advanced Checking.. Notice that the days of sacrifice are not over. It implies that the action was a free and voluntary offering. THE CHRISTIAN'S DUTY. 4 What then shall we say that Abraham, our forefather according to the flesh, discovered in this matter? Commentary on Romans 12:1,2 (Read Romans 12:1,2) The apostle having closed the part of his epistle wherein he argues and proves various doctrines which are practically applied, here urges important duties from gospel principles. 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romans 12:1 commentary

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romans 12:1 commentary

A. The Syriac, "That ye present your bodies, etc., by a rational ministry.". Get a verified writer to help you with Exegetical Commentary on Romans 12: 1-13. Barnes's Romans 12:1 Bible Commentary I beseech you - The apostle, having finished the argument of this Epistle, proceeds now to close it with a practical or hortatory application, showing its bearing on the duties of life, and the practical influence of religion. Ro 12:1-21. The offering of ourselves should be voluntary. We observe that we have here, first, an all-inclusive directory for the outward life. So the Jews F11 say, a living sacrifice, in opposition to the bodies of slain beasts offered under the legal dispensation, and to the dead works of such as are destitute of faith in Christ, and to the lifeless performances of the saints themselves at certain times; and designs such a presentation of themselves in the performance of religious duties, as springs from a principle of life under the quickening influences of the Spirit of God, with faith and fervency; though without any view to obtain life hereby, for that is only by the offering up of the body of Christ once for all. (1) At this point the Apostle turns from the speculative, or doctrinal, portion of his Epistle, and begins a series of practical exhortations to his readers as to their lives as Christians. So Rev., in margin. Let the eye look on no evil, and it is a sacrifice. Romans 12:1 Context. Romans 12:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] Romans 12:1, NIV: "Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God's mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God--this is your true and proper worship." Biblical Commentary (Bible study) Romans 12:1-8 EXEGESIS: ROMANS 12:1-2. Which is why bodies like ours are acceptable. This is the nature of true religion. Many are expecting to be Christians in sickness; many in old age; thus purposing to offer unto him the blind and the lame. Some think this is added, to show a difference between the sacrifice here required, and that of the Jews, which was of unreasonable beasts. Not the feebleness of sickness merely; not old age alone; not time which we cannot otherwise employ, but the first vigor and energies of the mind and body; our youth, and health, and strength. www.easyenglish.bible. None of the doctrines of the gospel are designed to be cold and barren speculations. 2 Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. 2 Do not conformh to the pattern of this world,i but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.j Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will isk—his good, pleasingl and perfect will. Romans 12:1 and 2 address the Christian personally and individually. This is the opening portion of Paul’s conclusion to the letter to the Romans, the introduction to the moral instruction that follows from the theological presentation of the first part of the letter.Study questions on the text have been added here. 21. They are to do just what God requires of them, and that will be acceptable to God. I consider myself to be a slave of *Christ Jesus. Submitted by admin on Wed, 2009-04-29 20:56. HIRE verified writer $35.80 for a 2-page paper. 451201 > ROMANS 12:1-21 HERE we enter on the second division of this Epistle, where Paul, according to his accustomed method, enforces the duties of believers, by arguments dependent on his previous exhibition of the grand and influential doctrines of the Gospel.These doctrines, as well as all the commandments of God, may be summed up in one word, namely, in\parLOVE. see 1 Corinthians 1:10; Romans 15:30. acceptable to God through the mediation of his Son, by whom, as the persons, the souls and bodies of his people, so their spiritual sacrifices, whether of prayer or praise, are only acceptable to him: which is your reasonable service; it is agreeably to reason, and especially as sanctified, that men who have their beings from God, and are upheld in them by him, and are followed with the bounties of Providence; and especially who are made new creatures, and are blessed by him with all spiritual blessings in Christ, that they should give up themselves to him, and cheerfully serve him in their day and generation; such service is also agreeably to the Scriptures of truth, the standard of filth and practice, and contain and enforce nothing but what is highly reasonable to be complied with; it is such service as lies not in the slaying of irrational creatures, but in the presenting of men endued with rational powers unto God; and is of a spiritual nature, performed by spiritual men, under the influence of the Spirit of God: and is suitable to the nature and perfections of God, and stands opposed to the corporeal and carnal service of the Jews. That word λογικὴν logikēn denotes what pertains to the mind, and a reasonable service means what is mental, or pertaining to reason. 2 And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God. Therefore.—We may well believe that the Apostle having brought his argument up to a climax at the close of the last chapter, would make a pause in his dictation, and perhaps not resume it until another sitting. Religion is free; and the act of devoting ourselves to God is one of the most free that we ever perform. Let thine eye look upon no evil thing, and it hath become a sacrifice; let thy tongue speak nothing filthy, and it hath become an offering; let thy hand do no lawless deed, and it hath become a whole burnt offering. Commentary on Romans 12:1-8 View Bible Text While the argument of the letter to the Romans opened with a preoccupation regarding God’s anger (1:18-32), this section of the letter opens with an embrace of God’s mercies. The first part of this passage reminds us that we are unable to put others first without God’s saving grace. (3) In this light, what are we to think of the so-called "unbloody sacrifice of the mass, continually offered to God as a propitiation for the sins both of the living and the dead," which the adherents of Rome's corrupt faith have been taught for ages to believe is the highest and holiest act of Christian worship--in direct opposition to the sublimely simple teaching which the Christians of Rome first received ( … Ministers of the gospel should be gentle, tender, and affectionate. As Wesley, the failed missionary, said later: “While he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed. J.B. Phillips has an outstanding and memorable translation of Romans 12:1-2: With eyes wide open to the mercies of God, I beg you, my brothers, as an act of intelligent worship, to give Him your bodies, as a living sacrifice, consecrated to Him and acceptable by Him. It implies that he who offers it presents it entirely, releases all claim or right to it, and leaves it to be disposed of for the honor of God. Specifically, we will attempt to speculate on the reason why Paul wrote Romans 12:1-13. spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God by Jesus Christ. a. Romans 12:14-17 Commentary. In like manner we are to consecrate to God our best faculties; the vigor of our minds, and talents, and time. There is something very affecting in the view of such a sacrifice; in regarding life, with all its energies, its intellectual, and moral, and physical powers, as one long sacrifice; one continued offering unto God. The apostle specifies their bodies particularly in reference to that fact. Familiarity often breeds contempt and since we have heard the words of Romans 12:1 and 2 so often, we might think we will learn nothing new from them. Romans 12:3-6 Commentary. The Jew offered his victim, slew it, and presented it dead. Which is your reasonable service (τὴν λογικὴν λατρείαν). Reasonable service.—The English phrase is somewhat ambiguous. If offered without any of these defects, it was regarded as holy, that is, appropriately set apart, or consecrated to God. It was not customary or proper to speak of a sacrifice as an offering of a soul or spirit, in the common language of the Jews; and hence, the apostle applied their customary language of sacrifice to the offering which Christians were to make of themselves to God. The word "reasonable" with us means what is "governed by reason; thinking, speaking, or acting conformably to the dictates of reason" (Webster); or what can be shown to be rational or proper. Let the tongue utter nothing base, and it is an offering. Note, secondly, the relation between this priestly service and other kinds of worship. All rights reserved. Commentary, Romans 12:1-8, Mary Hinkle Shore,, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2011." unto God—not as the Levitical offerings, merely as appointed symbols of spiritual ideas, but objects, intrinsically, of divine complacency, in their renewed character, and endeared relationship to Him through His Son Jesus Christ. It is the technical term for presenting the Levitical victims and offerings. Romans 12:1. παρακαλῶ οὖν: the reference is to all that has been said since Romans 1:16, but especially to what more closely precedes. (3) the character of God is such as should lead us to that. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. It could not be presented again. Your bodies - The bodies of animals were offered in sacrifice. Duties of Believers, General and Particular. Believers are to dedicate themselves to God. Paul wrote to address a local problem or crisis. From expressions like these, it is clear that the apostle never supposed that the tendency of the doctrines of grace was to lead to licentiousness. So, expressly, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. It demands vigorous and active powers in the service of God the Saviour. Sanctification extends to the whole man (1Th 5:23, 24). ... C. K. Barrett, A Commentary on t he Epistle to the Romans (New York: Harper and Row, 1957), p. 231. II. This was a ground or reason why they should devote themselves to God. “Therefore I exhort you, brothers and sisters, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a sacrifice – alive, holy, and pleasing to God – which is your reasonable service. The worshipper must offer, or present, before God, himself, with all his living energies and powers directed consciously to God’s service. Romans 13:3-4 Commentary. In order to seek His full blessing, and live out God’s holy will, there lie before us three things. But it is plain that Paul had no such apprehensions. To please him should be our highest aim; the fact that we do please him is our highest reward. The word "mercies" here denotes favor shown to the undeserving, or kindness, compassion, etc. The Holy Spirit (through Paul) tells us how we can be transformable in Romans 12:1-2. That ye present - The word used here commonly denotes the action of bringing and presenting an animal or other sacrifice before an altar. By the mercies of God: he useth the word in the plural number, to amplify and set forth the manifold mercies of God, in election, justification, adoption, &c.: q.d. Romans 12:1-20 New International Version (NIV) A Living Sacrifice 12 Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. The introduction to these exhortations, is in a very kind and affectionate manner; the saints are addressed as "brethren", and very appropriately; since this expresses the relation they stood in to the apostle, for whom he had an hearty love and concern; and therefore what he pressed them to was out of a sincere regard to their good, as well as to the glory of God; also their relation to each other, and which several of the duties he urges had a connection with; likewise their relation to God, being of his family, having one and the same Father, and so under obligation to regard his will, honour and reverence him: moreover, these things are moved, not in an imperious way, in an authoritative manner, but by way of entreaty, "I beseech you"; as an ambassador of Christ, and as though in his stead: nor are they enforced by terrors, threats, and menaces, but "by the mercies of God"; that is, the abundant mercy of God, displayed in their election, regeneration, and calling; than which, nothing can have a greater influence on a believer, to engage him to holiness of life and conversation; and shows, that the doctrines of grace are no licentious ones, nor do they render useless precepts, exhortations, entreaties, cautions, and advice, particularly such as follow; that ye present your bodies; not barely that part of them commonly so called, for this is not to be understood of a mere presentation of the body in public worship: for though this ought to be, yet not without the heart engaged therein, otherwise bodily exercise will be of no avail; nor of a bare abstinence from grosser sins done in the body, and against it, and which defile and dishonour it; much less of a maceration, and keeping under the body, by watchings, fasting, &c. and still less of an offering of the body at death in a way of martyrdom, though this ought to be cheerfully complied with when called for: but by their bodies are meant, themselves, their whole souls and bodies, all the powers and faculties of their souls, and members of their bodies; and the presenting of them, designs a devoting of them, with all readiness and willingness, to the service of God for his honour and glory, without putting any confidence in, or placing any dependence upon them; which would be sacrificing to their own net, and burning incense to their drag; it includes the whole of their service, conversation, and religion, internal and external. Compiled & Edited by BST & Crosswalk Staff, California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. A list of the best commentaries on Romans ranked by scholars, journal reviews, and site users. Some spiritual gift — With such gifts the Corinthians, who had enjoyed the presence of St. Paul, abounded, 1 Corinthians 1:7; 12:1; 14:1. Having thoroughly and systematically presented every aspect of the glorious gospel of Salvation, and the eternal foundation of God’s amazing grace, … And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed41by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect. It’s for your own good, it’s My will, and it pleases Me.” God’s almighty powerful Spirit is living inside of us. romans 12:1-2. Still the entire animal was devoted; and Paul evidently meant here the same as to say, present Yourselves, your entire person, to the service of God; compare 1 Corinthians 6:16; James 3:6. We'll send you an email with steps on how to reset your password. Commentary on Romans 12:1-8 View Bible Text At first glance, Paul’s appeal to his audience to “present your bodies as a living sacrifice” for “your spiritual worship” might sound like he is demanding an esoteric or mystical kind of devotion. This commentary has been through Advanced Checking.. Notice that the days of sacrifice are not over. It implies that the action was a free and voluntary offering. THE CHRISTIAN'S DUTY. 4 What then shall we say that Abraham, our forefather according to the flesh, discovered in this matter? Commentary on Romans 12:1,2 (Read Romans 12:1,2) The apostle having closed the part of his epistle wherein he argues and proves various doctrines which are practically applied, here urges important duties from gospel principles.

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